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Author Topic: Miscellaneous Casting Videos  (Read 3081 times)
admin
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TN


« on: March 28, 2016, 02:04:04 PM »

My first iron pour:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=To5tepT4yD4&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA

My second iron pour:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KOlUxyfvbk&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA


Here are videos from the Metal Museum iron pour.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZef_qW0Oew&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQoHXNbRzAk&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbMWwlrGO9o&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA


Here is an iron pour at Tannehill Alabama.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1obuPr2O4k&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PiQrN2KeZ3s&list=UURK-3rkIpWUDBIFgG9rkxgA
« Last Edit: March 28, 2016, 02:05:51 PM by admin » Logged

What did you cast today ?
admin
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TN


« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2016, 02:09:24 PM »

A resin-binder example.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFMXF7szrj4


H. Goodwin Castings (An intricate green sand moulding process)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSLZQU64F-I

I have not viewed these videos, but it looks to have some interesting ideas in it as far as a scientific approach to
casting:
https://www.youtube.com/user/bobpuhakka/videos


From "castingcowboy". The only thing more impressive than the casting in some of these videos is the lack of safety equipment.
I was using a cutting torch one time, and a molten blob fell into the top of my laced boot. I could not unlace it fast enough,
and something like that just vaporizes skin, like a melted down nuclear reactor core. Boy was I glad that molten blob was not
any bigger than it was, or I would have had to grow a new toe.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvD2nxP4nu0

Casting in Bangladesh:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ECx5HlCfxY


Metal casting at Ohio State:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XO3pK3iUck

Cast iron cookwear foundry in France:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk5aX1Sp954

Jamke Foundries - Grey Iron Casting Crucibles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2lGNldQdfg


Shell molding foundry:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BYe7rZ0v6E

Furnace on wheels: (yikes, pouring in tennis shoes)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnVrYKWLnWg

Koluszki Foundry and Machinery:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ahr7sKate4

Gartland Foundry: (This guy has the sand part down to a science)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhMMZgXJZJA&playnext=1&list=PL4E51819E1EC3CAB8




16,000 lb. cast iron pour:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4zpfFVVYks


Cast handles:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlQ54WATvzA

Melting cast iron with propane (I understand you should use a clay crucible with cast iron due to the temperature)
(Note: That crucible does look hotter than hell when he pulls it out of the furnace, and I sure as heck would not attempt this
indoors)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z43q6wF8aL4

How to cast a bronze plaque (maybe useful for lettering on engine frames)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZemAj-6yn0

Indian foundry with induction furnace:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7yUVHV-UtA

CWU Foundry (pouring aluminum, bronze and cast iron)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1_AO4Pw7Wk




Large Cupola:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGLHFoa-9Tg&playnext=1&list=PL59B12432A1DABFFC

Cupola Furnace (wow, lots of manpower required)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPnZmbQtMDU&feature=related

Iron pouring (this looks dangerous without foot protection)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YE_xpHourT8

Green sand casting for a steam engine part:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5qM_vjz13A
« Last Edit: March 28, 2016, 02:23:26 PM by admin » Logged

What did you cast today ?
admin
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TN


« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2016, 02:51:24 PM »

I updated this topic today.
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What did you cast today ?
cae2100
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Posts: 75


« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2016, 10:58:02 PM »

I found your videos on YT the other day and I mainly just recognized them by your green dual wobbler that you showed a few times on AA, but I was looking through and saw this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpO-reA7V_I

Ive never seen any type of brass burn like that, it looks like you were melting and trying to cast magnesium parts rather than brass. Thats the only metal that ive seen that lights up like that and gives off the smoke like that. I ended up with a bit of naval brass from some splined insert pieces in aluminum boat propellers, I was going to knock them out and melt them down, and that was the only naval brass casting video that Ive been able to find, most are just people forging it and twisting it up or something else. I was just wanting to make sure that it wasnt like that because that looks like it is like magnesium, but when I was looking into the alloy composition, there is nothing that should flare up like that imo.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2016, 11:02:19 PM by cae2100 » Logged
admin
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TN


« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2016, 07:11:20 AM »

That was boat shaft, which I assume was Naval Brass, but I am not positive about that.

The boat shaft machines more like steel, with a ribbon of swarf coming off in the lathe in a long continuous piece just like steel, and it is really strong and tough material, much like steel but without the corrosion problems.

I gave up trying to use it since it seems to have a high stiction, unlike bearing bronze that moved easily and wears well against most other metal.

The pour above probably would have turned out ok if the adhesive holding the two mold halves together had not failed.
I should have added some weights on top the mold.
High density metals create a lot more force on the mold than low density metal such as aluminum.

The trick with this metal was to reach pour temperature, which I assumed was around 2150 F, but that was just a guess.
As it approached 2150 F, the zinc started to produce a lot of fumes, which is what you see in the video, and when the furnace lid is opened, the oxygen causes the smoke to burn.
It is not a violent reaction like magnesium burning, but just burning smoke.

I have not done much brass/bronze work, but as I understand it (which is not much), brass and brass-like metal is more difficult to handle due to the zinc boiling off and flaming.
A bronze alloy may be easier to melt since it may have little or no zinc in it; I think Everdur is an easy bronze to melt and pour but check me on that.

http://www.belmontmetals.com/product/everdur-silicon-bronze/

I avoid casting zinc alloys such as brass these days; it is not worth the trouble, and it creates way to much smoke and fumes.

I have not tried cast iron again this year, but I did get about 1,000 lbs of iron scrap a couple of months ago, just in case I decide to do more iron work.

Aluminum is so easy and economical to melt and pour that I have been using it exclusively this year.
I often temper the aluminum to T-6 specifications, which makes it much harder, and gets rid of the gummyness that tends to load up tool bits.
But I also use some untempered 356 aluminum parts, and it is really not too bad to work with, but tempered is easier if you have the time to do it.


Edit:
Here is a copper/brass/bronze summary.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysInnHOoouc


« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 07:18:58 AM by admin » Logged

What did you cast today ?
cae2100
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Posts: 75


« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2016, 04:37:51 PM »

oh, ok, that temp seems kinda high to me from when i looked up the datasheets on the alloy. When I looked up the datasheets and such, most was showing the liquidus for naval brass to be 1650F or somewhere around there, lol.

I was thinking about casting some round rod out of it and using it to make some bushings for my gingery lathe with it. I saw it was really good as a bearing material, and I kept looking into getting the right bushings and such, then finally found this pile of naval brass stuff that I could melt down to make a good bushing for free. I rather cast something out and make my own stuff rather than buying some crap bronze bushing that feels like it's going to fall apart on the first use, or at least thats what the ones here in most hardware stores are like.
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