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Author Topic: Rhodes Shaper Vise  (Read 1696 times)
cae2100
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« on: October 08, 2016, 10:57:12 PM »

Here is my collection of the rhodes shaper vise info, I stuck it all in my google drive and see how the vise goes together along with a pdf file of the one guy's vise, which was the original one that came from the factory in the 1920s. From what ive seen, there has been many different types of vises to match different beds for the rhodes shaper over the years, but the overall dimensions have continued to be the same, mainly the dimensions that changed was the shaft size on the swivel that goes down into the shaper bed.

Ive included a bunch of pictures to show how some were at different angles and how they all fit together with the plans in the PDF file. All of the vises that Ive seen, they've never had the T slots in them or the slides like in the blueprints, also Ive never seen the .875 hole in the back, and no idea why that is there in his, it's not on any other vises, so that can be ignored, but the rest of the stuff is true to every rhodes shaper vise that Ive found.

Here's the info and blueprints.
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BwYG1PFb3ZByZUJJYlhKcVphZlU

The vise is extremely thick and bulky, so even cast in aluminum, it should withstand any abuse you would really throw at it. I liked it due to the fact that the back jaw swivels so you can hold tapered items, or turn the jaw around and hold round stock or whatever vertically to machine off the ends of stuff easily. With different jaw pads, you can hold almost anything in the vise very easily, and It'll be easy to replace them should the need arise. I have a set of patterns slightly larger of all of the parts in the pdf file and I love the look and rigidity of the vise, as soon as I get some cast tomorrow, I might throw up some pics of the castings too.

I did not draw these blueprints, they were done by a guy in california that had took the dimensions off of the original shaper vise for me, so all credit for the blueprints go to him.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2016, 11:02:22 PM by cae2100 » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2016, 09:38:36 PM »

That is a nice looking vice and shaper.

I guess the holes are for accessories of some sort, or a quick change face?
I have no idea.

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cae2100
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2016, 11:59:56 PM »

yea, I havnt been able to figure it out either, so I just didnt add them onto mine. I ended up making the pattern and casting everything out, just need to clamp it down to the shaper bed and clean it up as soon as the base is painted and dried. Right now, the base of the shaper and motor are all apart in pieces to be stripped and painted because it was in horribly bad shape when I got it, but we just put the primer on it, so it's going to be a few days before I can re-attach the motor and get it cleaned up.

For the size and thickness of it, I was thinking of casting a few of them and just making them into a bench vise because even made in aluminum, it should easily be as strong or stronger than most cheap import ones that you find anymore.
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cae2100
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2016, 02:21:36 AM »

hey, you said you wanted to see some pics of what Ive gotten done so far, and I dont have any pics of the machined vise jaw yet, but with the shaper, it keeps coming out like glass, no machining marks at all and it just glides on glass if you try sliding it across a piece of glass. It almost acts like it's keeping an air pocket underneath of it when it's slid across a surface plate or a piece of plate glass, which I think is kinda odd but pretty cool really. The base, I was trying to figure out how to mount a 7 inch long casting to a 7 inch shaper, and actually be able to machine everything, which I think Ive figured it out, but we had to leave for soule before I was able to try it. When I was turning down the swivel base's part around the threaded rod, it grabbed on the lathe, and tore out a chunk of the sleeve, so thats why it looks like it has threaded rod all the way around but not in the other pics, but there is enough meat left on it all the way around to still locate the sleeve into the bushing on the shaper's bed itself and have no side play once it's put into the bed itself.

Here's the pics of the vise so far, I just threw it up on my site since I have no idea how to post pictures on here without having to go through some file upload site like imageshack, which imo is a pain, so I just throw them on my site, lol.

https://cae2100.wordpress.com/2016/11/06/rhodes-shaper-vise-clone/

I had also made up a small pattern and cast it for some T nuts for the shaper since I didnt have any way to hold anything in the shaper itself, so I just rough cast an T nut blank and used the belt sander to sand them to size and clean it up. I then drilled, tapped, and cut to size in 4 different pieces, and those things have been so handy that I actually plan on making many many more for backups in case I lose one, and also make stuff like clamping dogs and such with them.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2016, 02:30:16 AM by cae2100 » Logged
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2016, 11:49:43 PM »

Looks like the shaper vice is going well.

Are you going to use removable/replaceable jaws?
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cae2100
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« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2016, 12:14:02 AM »

yep, Ill have removable steel jaws so that I can make stuff like a checkered pattern, smooth jaws, or one with a V grove in it like a V block so it can hold stuff in order to hold stuff like round stock to cut square or hex shapes in the shafts so that I can make stuff like lathe chuck keys or whatever, or bolt heads with it.

As soon as the vise is done, I plan on making an indexing center so it can be used to cut gears, index stuff perfectly, and a angle plate for cutting keyways and internal stuff with a U groove in it to allow for holding in odd positions and make mounting pulleys really easy.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2016, 12:19:44 AM by cae2100 » Logged
cae2100
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« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2016, 07:32:37 AM »

I figured a progress update should be in order since Ive gotten much further on this. All that is left is to make the nut and shaft, and from there, it's just assembling it and giving it one final machining and machine up some steel jaws.

Here's pics and stuff:
https://cae2100.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/shaper-vise-clone-update/
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« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2016, 03:04:18 PM »

It looks great.
Well done.
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cae2100
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« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2016, 10:42:47 AM »

I figured I would post this to finish up this thread, the shaper is all finished, vise is finished also, fully machined, painted, etc and looks much bigger in person than it does in the pics.

https://cae2100.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/shaper-vise-clone-and-shaper-restoration-finish/

All that it really needs is just the replaceable steel jaws, but I went to take a break on it to finish up another project that Ive been working on for around the last year, and had just gotten the last part for it a week or two ago. Also it gives me time to figure out what types of jaws and such that I wanted for the vise while waiting on getting some steel for it.
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woodguy
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« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2016, 10:57:01 AM »

Beautiful job.
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cae2100
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« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2016, 02:38:38 PM »

thanks, I just loved the look of that vise for some reason, and the oddity of it since I hadnt seen anything else like it before, also it was the same one that was made for the shaper when it was manufactured, so tried to keep it original. I did learn quite a bit about operating the shaper and it's little tweaks and such while making this, and I would defenitely recommend it as a project for whoever is getting into machining using a shaper or milling machine in a home shop. It defenitely shows different setups and such that you would need to do and in the end, you get a very sturdy vise that can be used as a milling vise or as a bench vise.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2016, 07:37:40 PM by cae2100 » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2016, 03:29:46 PM »

That turned out really nice.
It looks to be very beefy, and the reversible end is a nice feature for holding round objects.

You have some cool old machine tools.
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woodguy
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« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2016, 04:48:23 PM »

A shaper is one of those things I wish a friendly neighbour had - along with a Huge lathe and a Bridgeport..........
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cae2100
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« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2016, 07:50:59 PM »

I have an early 9x40" monarch jr lathe, from around 1915-1920 that is the next restoration project, and I honestly dont use it as much as the shaper really. Ill have to wait till my shop is finished to attach the lineshaft's countershaft to the ceiling so that I can use the lathe when I start getting it finished, which will be in the summer, otherwise I'll have to put the crap that is attached to it now back on it to use it, and it barely works as is. I have to wait till summer anyhow to strip everything down and to repaint it, otherwise the paint will just freeze and destroy the paint job.

I thought about getting a milling machine too earlier on because I thought there was a few things the shaper couldnt do, but after looking around and such, I realized that there was more that the shaper could do than a milling machine could ever do and everything that I honestly could think of, the shaper could do that the milling machine could. I have V grooving tools, slotting tools, keyway/spline cutting tools, round nose tools, I can do slotting, grooving, milling contours and oddball shapes and forms that a milling could do with just the shaper and an indexing center/indexing head, and also it beyond excels at making things flat and smooth, the finish with a course feed on mine looks like brushed metal, and fine feed, it feels like glass, and is so smooth that you can see your reflection in it with no real visible machining marks, it looks like a ground finish.

The only thing that I wish was different on mine or wishing was different on mine would be that I wish that it was bigger, lol. Ive maxed out the size of the bed quite a few times already, but 7 inch cubed cutting area is still pretty good size tho. Ive used a bridgeport before and while I know it is faster on some things, the shaper is much cheaper on cutters and can be resharpened over and over again without some fancy grinding setups, and the finish is much better. I honestly spend time in the shop and foundry to escape everything else here, so if it takes 5-8 mins to do a job on a bridgeport with a crappy finish or 10 mins on the shaper, that means I get 10 mins to myself while just doing my own thing and get a better finish.

I find the shaper is like a 3d printer, if you ever sat down and watched a 3d printer print and see how it works, you end up watching it and before you realize it, it's done and a half an hour or an hour has gone past and you dont even realize it, the shaper is the same way imo. So the time it takes to machine something, you dont really notice it really unless you are in a production environment, then it may be much faster and more profit in exchange for finish and quality. I prefer quality over quantity any day.

If your curious what all a shaper can do, here's a folder with my collection of shaper stuff including the blueprints for various tooling for all kinds of jobs like a slitting saw, slotting tool, custom hold-downs, etc. There's also a bunch of books on different setups that can be used on milling machines or shapers, and different tooling and plans for said tooling to do all kinds of stuff that you wouldnt think that you would be able to do, so you can litterally do anything and everything on a shaper.
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BwYG1PFb3ZByYnE4SFNuY29KcG8?usp=sharing
« Last Edit: December 11, 2016, 08:46:27 PM by cae2100 » Logged
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