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Author Topic: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)  (Read 3603 times)

cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #40 on: July 24, 2017, 04:04:48 PM »

I was researching the crap out of calculating the stuff for the steam engine power and such, so hopefully I have my calculations correct. I found a few sites that all showed pretty much the same information over and over again, so I took it for value since it was all across the board.

Here's the video I did on it, hopefully I wasnt too far off, lol.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRykFs-y9wc

Other than that, I got some steel to start working on the crankshaft, and more or less finished the body of the engine except drilling bolt holes to attach the cylinder and various holes for attaching the stuff to it. I need to look to see if I have the steel to do the crank webs, but I think I do somewhere here, or at least Im hoping, lol. I do have to say that the HF flap wheel was probably one of the best flap wheels I have ever gotten for doing that stuff. Most are off balance, even the dewalt ones, and just wear down like nothing. The HF one, there was no vibrations and it didnt even touch the wheel grinding all of the flashing off.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #41 on: July 24, 2017, 09:27:21 PM »

I have seen several versions of horsepower calculations, but for small workshop engines (which is mainly what I do), I don't quite trust that the calcs scale down correctly.

My thoughts were to build a brake so that I could measure the actual horsepower produced, and perhaps get a better feel for the horsepower produced at a given pressure or set of pressures, and with a boiler, you could compare steam vs compressed air horsepower produced.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #42 on: July 25, 2017, 01:25:25 AM »

yea, I was thinking of using a prony brake when I get the engine finished, but Im just trying to get general idea of it and general range of what Im looking at. The point in the video I was trying to convey was how a boiler changes the HP of an engine and why different boilers at different pressures changes the HP and power output of the engines. It also helps understand the boiler to engine relationship and calculate out the bhp and lbs/hr of steam for the boilers (amount of water usage per hour to calculate run times and such)
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #43 on: July 25, 2017, 02:45:34 AM »

I did not have time to watch the video closely; I will have to go back and watch it again.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #44 on: August 01, 2017, 12:04:53 AM »

I figured I would do an update, Ive been busting ass on that engine lately when I get time, lol. I made a bunch of what looks like really long set screws, but I screwed them into the cylinder and tightened them in so they were beneath the cylinder cover. I did that so it held all of the bolt holes in place to the cylinder, to locate everything, then I put a bunch of superglue on the other end of the cylinder cover, and stuck the body of the engine and the cylinder cover together while getting it all square and aligned where I wanted it, then I just held it till the superglue stuck. After that, I just used the holes in the cylinder cover to use as a drill guide for the bolt holes in the body of the engine, so now I have the cylinder attached to the body.

I also was working on designing the crosshead guides, which I just doodled up in cad to get a good idea of what I wanted, then I 3d printed it to get a general idea of the sizes that I needed. The print is around 3/32 too tall I believe still, but everything else is perfect for the design. I got the bearing caps and bearing supports made up, the lathe is fixed and ready to make the crankshaft, and eccentric strap/sheave. I just need to get some steel big enough to make the eccentric sheave, which Ill have to save up a little bit again before I can get that. I also need to make a height gauge for making sure that the middle of the crankshaft/bearing supports are on center height with the crosshead/piston rod.

I also have the eccentric strap laid out to start boring it out, which I really want to make a trepanning tool so that I dont turn all of the inside of the part to chips/little needles, and the waste, I can just remelt. I did the layout lines to show where to split it, which I may split it first, then solder it back together and machine it so that there is no gap in between the two pieces.

We were working like crazy on the shop also, getting the inside of it all sealed up, and it is defenitely insulated now, lol. I also got my first piece of equipment in it also, the most important one, lol. It takes around 1 degree per minute to cool it till it gets up and running, then it will drop 3-4 degrees every minute, and it's one of the lowest powered ones we could find. The whole thing is insulated beyond belief, but it'll be very easy to heat in the winter with a small heater, and cool in the summer, even on the hottest days without much trouble at all. We also put a few 2x8s in between the rafters and added a ton more support around them. We did that so I can hang the lathe's countershaft back on the ceiling and restore it all back to working order and so I no longer lose skin off of my knuckles from hitting them on the angle iron crap they have bolted to the lathe now. The ceiling is double insulated, so there's two layers of 3/4" aluminized foam insulation where as the walls have one layer, but behind them is the fiberglass insulation.

« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 12:06:21 AM by cae2100 »
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #45 on: August 01, 2017, 02:57:22 AM »

The engine is looking good, as is the shop.

Nothing quite like AC when the outside temps hit 100 + F.

I can work without heat in the winter better than I can work in the high heat and humidity that we get around here.
Much easier to warm up than to cool off.

I never had much luck with circle cutters, they always would hang up just about time I got the done.
You could use a hole saw and start a hole first.

I have not made an eccentric strap yet, but have seen a few made.

Any ideas on how you plan on making the crankshaft?  Seems like you told me, but I forgot.
I think I am going to try the motorcycle method, which is to heat the crank disks and cool the shafts and pin, and press it all together, and then probably pin the joints for good measure.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 04:48:00 AM by admin »
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #46 on: August 01, 2017, 03:48:09 AM »

I wasnt talking about a circle cutter, I was talking about a trepanning bit for the lathe. A hole saw would work too I guess, I may take that route if I cant find an extra bit to turn into a trepanning bit. It's kinda like a parting tool, but designed to go along the front face of the work and cut the inside of it out. I believe it was oxtool that did a video on making cast iron rings with a trepanning tool, that way it didnt waste alot of material, it just cut out the outside ring out of it and you are left with the solid core center left.

The crankshaft, I was originally thinking of shrink fitting the stuff and welding it originally, but the more I look, I keep thinking about just pinning it also. I bought oversized stock for the stuff to clean off the welds and machine any warp out of it, just by machining between centers. Either way, I plan on assembling the whole thing and turning it down to size, I just need to get the lathe torn down and reassembled in the shop so that I can level it and get any and all twist/taper out of it.

As for the heat, I cant do anything in it, thats why I mainly am working on stuff during the nights during the summer, so that it isnt so unbearably hot, unfortunately around here, even at night time, it'll be hot and ending up being even more humid, but the AC and the way the shop is designed, it will remove almost all humidity from getting into the shop, and the AC will get rid of the rest. Thats why I was just cooking down at soule last year, going from cool weather around here to hot and humid down there, I felt like a pig at a BBQ, lol.

I thought about making the crank disks, kinda like PM research's no9 engine, but after seeing how everything looks now, Im thinking of going for the conventional design, but just make the counterbalance weights removable, and just bolt on, then filling the slot with the bolt heads in with babbit to make it solid and seamless design. As for if I actually do it that way or just cut the stuff out and shape it, thats up for debate, lol. I do like how they do the modern crankshafts with the centrifugal oiling of the crank pin, where it will come in at one of the bearing caps and sligs the oil through the crankshaft into the crank pin, oiling the crank pin bearing. Im just curious if 1/2" thick crank webs will be thick enough for that thing to keep within proportion, or if Im going to have to get 5/8".

Edit: after looking at the casting, I cant use a hole saw, that off center hole that I used to hold the casting so I could face it off and clean it up, it wouldnt let me get any way to really use the hole saw, and if it did, it would keep wanting to jump back into that hole, making the whole thing off center still. The lathe trepanning tool is probably the best and safest bet imo.

Also, here's the video on the trepanning tool, I was going to make one of those anyhow, so it's not a big deal to make it now and use it, lol.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PcEBaset1I
I believe that MrCrispin did a video using one a long time ago also.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2KIuinEuZQ
« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 04:34:49 AM by cae2100 »
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #47 on: August 01, 2017, 05:13:53 AM »

I had not see the trepanning thing before.
After watching the videos I can see how it would work with enough clearance on the bit.

I have had trouble making cuts like that, and wondered if there was a better way; now I know.


Here are a couple of crankshaft rebuilding videos.

One note of safety for those who may not know it: Don't put your face next to a hydraulic press; things can fly out of those at a very high speed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9h-AbRQLGgA&spfreload=10

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1T_1SzD2Og&spfreload=10

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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #48 on: August 01, 2017, 05:24:30 PM »

I dont have a hydraulic press to press the stuff in place, so I was just thinking that I would just use some dry ice on the crank pin/shaft pieces and heat the crank webs  in my furnace to heat it up and while the crankwebs are expanded from the heat and the pins/shaft is shrunk due to the cold of the dry ice, that they would just slide together until the heat normalized.

That second video was actually really informative, I always wondered how to get those stupid bearings off, lol. Ive dealt with a few of them that I just had to toss the bearings and all because I couldnt get the bearing off. That reminds me that I need to order a few new bearings for my generator housing one of these days, eventually Ill get back to working on that thing, lol.

I was looking at making conventional crankshaft rather than the disk crank after seeing it on my engine, but I may just make a disk crank at first to see how it looks, then just cut the counterbalanced cranks from that, who knows, lol.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #49 on: August 06, 2017, 11:29:08 PM »

Well, I have some news on the steam engine build, and I really dont think that it'll be ready for algonquin or even soule. Ive been having some problems with my lathe for a while now and I finally took today and went to see what was going on with it. The angle iron crap on it was actually binding the whole headstock up and the backgears pin was knocking on the bushings because of all of the excessive weight and twist from the angle iron crap. I was planning on stripping and painting the countershaft and everything anyhow, so it looks like now is the time to work on it before I go any further so that I can get the problems fixed before I start on the crankshaft. Any defects present in the lathe due to twist or play will translate to the crankshaft in a massive way, so Im just going to tear it all down and do a lathe rebuild now, then Ill go back to the steam engine build probably this fall going on this winter when everything is inside of the shop and set up/leveled.

I got the angle iron stuff and it was actually so heavy that it took 3 people to lift off of the headstock, and whoever had the dumb idea to attach it to the headstock, I would love to knock some sense into them. No wonder it was twisting the headstock castings and everything out of alignment and such, Im seriously wondering how it didnt break something. After I got the stuff off, now it just rolls freely with no play, no more clicking sound from the backgears pin smacking the bearings, and no more busting my knuckles on stuff trying to use back gears. My father was looking at the backgears pin and never noticed it before and didnt know what it did because you couldnt even get your fingers into it to use it before with the angle iron stuff on it, yet alone get chuck keys in to tighten stuff up correctly.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #50 on: August 07, 2017, 05:22:14 AM »

That is a bummer.

Maybe you can rebuild it more quickly than you think.

Any chance of buying the same model off ebay for parts?

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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #51 on: August 07, 2017, 06:01:16 AM »

nope, not a chance, It's a monarch junior, which only a very small amount of them actually exist anymore. I contacted monarch about seeing if I could buy the split nuts for the lathe, and they said that they dont have anything for a lathe that old and most people count the 10EEs as the first ones that monarch really started making, so mine's pretty rare. Also, mine is so old that it doesnt really have a serial number or anything like that on it, so there's nothing in the system at monarch for getting replacement parts either.

I tore apart the headstock to see what happened that it was hitting, but when I got it apart, I saw that nothing was hitting, there was two teeth missing, one next to the other and it was jumpping over that, making that noise. Ill get the shaft and everything off and take it to my grandfather's house to get ground down a little bit where the broken teeth are so it acts as a key, then filled in with braze. After that, Ill just stick it in the shaper and use the two pins method to cut the teeth back into the gear to fix that.

I was looking into making a new split nut, just to test an idea/theory, but just make it out of plastic using the 3d printer, and get it usable just long enough to cut a thread in a new nut made of brass. The leadscrew, bed ways, gibs, etc are all in very good condition, and there's no real wear in any of the gears other than the broken teeth in the one. It looks like someone was trying to thread and crashed it badly, stripping out the split nut, breaking two teeth, and a nut in the compound slide, which Ill have to replace all of that. The headstock bushings are completely worn out and shot, but I plan on replacing those eventually, I just shimmed the bronze bearings to get them tightened up a little bit more, which took the play except 3-4 thou out of it.

I was planning on stripping and painting the countershaft stuff and putting it on the ceiling in the shop as soon as the walls are up, then I'll worry about getting everything else into there. Its going to be at least a good few months before I can even get started on the steam engine build again tbh. Ill just get the stuff done up that I dont need the lathe for, but for the most part, alot of the progress on it will have to be on hold till I get the lathe all fixed, everything rebuilt, taken to the new shop and completely leveled. I dont want to be cutting tapers in the crankshaft or messing up the bearings after getting this far into the build because the lathe isnt right.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #52 on: August 17, 2017, 02:23:53 AM »

Well, Ive hit a major wall on the steam engine build. The cad files that I did up for everything over the last few months are all gone, my laptop harddrive crapped out and I lost everything. I tried copying everything off using windows and windows is a useless piece of **** and deleted everything when I tried to copy it to back up the stuff. I had a backup that was a few months old, but it was before the recent stuff that I had saved, all of my cad blueprints, pictures, videos, and editing stuff is all gone. I have some stuff saved because I had uploaded it to youtube, but anything saved on here is all gone including the designs and such for the crankshaft, crosshead guides, etc.

On a side note, Ive been pouring myself into the lathe build like crazy recently, but with the heat and humidity last two days, it's been too hot to work in the garage, it's over 100 degrees in there atm and it's almost midnight. Im just worried about removing all of the paint and crap off of the castings, and the humidity flash rusting everything like it usually does around here. The stuff that I did get done up looks amazing tho and Im kinda excited to see how the lathe will look when Im finished with it, lol.

I fought with the designs of the crosshead guides and everything for so long that I do somewhat remember what dimensions everything needs to be somewhat, but it's going to be a long road ahead trying to redesign alot of the stuff again to put it back to blueprints. On the upside, I had 3d printed the stuff out to the sizes of everything I needed, so I can just measure the stuff off of the 3d prints to get most of the dimensions again for the crosshead guides. The crankshaft is going to be a whole other can of worms since I had it all done up until it just looked right and just fit right into the body of the engine and looked right, which was all measured exactly and put directly into the computer.

You can have a bulletproof operating system like I have, but when the harddrive itself dies, the bulletproof OS isnt really going to help for ****, lol. I think that Im just going to finish restoring the lathe for now, then afterwards, Ill worry about rebuilding my set of blueprints for everything.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 06:00:43 AM by admin »
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #53 on: August 17, 2017, 04:38:57 AM »

I watched some of your lathe rebuild videos yesterday.
Looks like that is quite a complex project, and I know that feeling well, I am mired in the middle of a few of those at the moment myself.

But the parts you have completed look great, and generally it looks like you have a pretty solid machine; it just needs some TLC.

I use flash drives to store everything I have; I never use hard drives to store anything except temporarily as a second backup.
I keep one set of flash drives at home, and one on my keychain that go wherever I go.
I had a number of hard drive failures over the years and learned not to ever rely on hard drives.
The brand of flash drive I use is SanDisk, and knock on wood, I have never had one fail.

Every time I make significant changes to an engine design, I make sure that I have at least two copies; one on a flash drive and one on a hard drive.

I have been using Solidworks to model engines, and then derive the 2D drawings from the 3D model.
It is much easier to design an engine in 3D, and much easier to propogate changes across multiple 3D parts in a 3D model.
When I was using 2D CADD to design engines, invariably I would change a part and not get all the dimensions in the various views completely updated.

There are some inexpensive 3D modeling programs out there that work pretty well.
I have been modeling the Speedy Twin from measurements taken from a full sized engine, and it is quite complex, so for me it would be pretty easy to model your engine.
I guess it is just a matter of getting familiar with the software.

Did you lose all your photos and stuff too?
That is a downer for sure.
I will bring some steam and IC photos on CD's so Soule.
I have quite a few photos I have collected over the years.


Edit:
I watched part 3 of the lathe rebuild.
You are more brave then me; that is a lot of parts to keep up with.
I am not sure I would want to rebuild a lathe.
There are far more pieces inside of those covers than I imagined.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 06:24:54 AM by admin »
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #54 on: August 17, 2017, 08:11:45 AM »

lol, thanks. Im kinda supprised on the lack of views on the lathe rebuild videos, but for those, Im doing the videos more for myself than for viewers tbh. As Im taking the stuff off and cleaning it up, Im storing all of the little bits in gallon sized ziplock baggies with numbers on them that go to a certain video and have what is in them. All of the baggies are in a drawer in my large toolbox, going from left to right so that I can assemble it from where I end back to the beginning to get a full lathe again. If you think that there's alot of parts already, you will shit when you see the next video, lol, I took apart the rest of the gear train on the headstock and the apron. I think I had 2 full baggies of shafts, bolts, gears, and little bits. I did find that the one gear on the handfeed gear has a broken tooth also, so it looks like I'll be brazing that one up too along with one of the back gears too that has a chipped tooth.

The apron will be a piece of cake now since all of the bushings and everything are out of it, and I wish that I could get some new oilers for it, but for the price of those things, I dont see that happening any time soon, lol. I do know that from tearing down the apron now, I need to pick up a few feet of cotton wick to put into the the wick-ways. They must have never been put back in, or they might have just been disintegrated over time. The lathe sure is a large project, but so was the shaper and I went over the shaper down to the very nuts and bolts, and redid it back up, and you see how it looks and runs now. When I tear something down to rebuild it, I leave nothing to be desired, lol.

Im used to using freecad, which I have modified it so that I have it linked in with my 3d printer software, cnc software, and pepakura. (program that unfolds 3d objects to papercraft print outs, great for accurately making things in sheet metal) I have it set up so that I just save the designs, then click one button and it is ready to print out on the 3d printers and such, and it's a really easy to use program once you figure out the basics.

I usually have my laptop synced up with my server, which would keep everything as an automatic backup, but the server was in the one room, but as my father kept falling down the stairs, they just moved thier bedroom downstairs into that room, and since then, I havnt been able to hook the server up to the network and sync the files. My old server has a raid 1 configuration because I also hosted a few other things off of that server which would not be able to be replaced in the past. After I unhooked and moved the server, I did a backup using my external HDD that I built, and since then, I forgot to back the stuff up again due to it being automatic before, lol. Hindsight may be 20/20, but it still bites you in the ass before you learn, lol.

I used to keep stuff on thumbdrives, but I have horrible luck with them, Ive killed probably 2 dozen in the last few years alone, mainly from using them so much.

The 3d models that I lost is pretty easy to replace, I remember alot of the dimensions and such that I needed, and the stuff I dont remember, I have a notebook that I usually use when measuring alot of things, so alot of the dimensions might be in there, and if not, I can always remeasure the stuff and just redo it.

The lathe project is quite a large project, but in all honesty, I find it actually much easier to do so far than the steam engine tbh. All of the bits and pieces are already there, you just need to do a little work to make it back up to 100%. It defenitely does need alot of TLC, but I knew this was a project lathe from the beginning. With cooler weather coming quickly and the shop getting finished inside even sooner, I wanted to get it moved into the shop and leveled before I did any more work on the steam engine so I wasnt turning a taper when I go to machine the crankshaft. I had a bit of trouble with that when I did the cylinder and it took hours of honing to get it all taken out of it to fix it. I tried doing the painting and such on the shaper last year, which the cooler weather gave me all kinds of hell with the paint and primer, it took weeks before it would fully cure and I had all kinds of trouble with getting it to flow, so I wanted to get the stuff done and fixed before cooler weather came in.

For the price that I paid for the lathe, and for the low amount of wear that Ive found in the bed, leadscrew, and components, I really doubt that you would find a monarch lathe that big, with an extended bed, and all of the tooling for the price that I paid for it. I kinda expected that a few things would need to be replaced and fixed from the beginning, but I never got around to tearing it down and cleaning the old thing up. Alot of the parts that Im seeing has been on there since it was made, I had to break the japanning away from the back of a few pieces because it was holding the parts onto the lathe bed, and it looked like the screws had never been taken off of the thing in over 95 years. It looked like someone tried, but they werent coming apart for anything, lol. I got a manual impact wrench that I was using to get the flat tipped screws off that had been stuck on there, and that thing was invaluable in tearing that thing down so far, lol.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 08:20:26 AM by cae2100 »
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #55 on: August 17, 2017, 08:21:33 AM »

I use a dehumidifier in my shops.
It keeps the moisture from condensing on the machine tool parts and rusting everything.
Even then I have to spray things down with WD40 every so often, but not nearly so much as before I had the duhumifier.

I also had some mold begin to grow on the walls and other things before I had a dehumidifier.
Around these parts the humidity can get very high in the summer, and a dehumidifier is pretty much a must unless you want to grease every metal surface.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #56 on: August 17, 2017, 05:04:43 PM »

yea, when I get the stuff into the new shop, it's all wood construction, so the wood will absorb all of the humidity and moisture before it gets into the shop, and also on top of that, it'll be heated and cooled, and when it's really damp, the AC will act like a dehumidifier also. The reason I was putting the stuff in baggies was not because of rust/humidity, but mainly just to keep everything seperate to the stuff Im tearing down from day to day, and so that I dont lose anything. The shop is designed so that the wood will act like a natural dehumidifier and keep any moisture out of it. All of the stuff in the garage had rusted like crazy over the winter, but the stuff that was in the shop, even tho the ceiling and rafters were open to the weather, there wasnt any real rust on anything in the shop, which with it sealed up now to outside elements, moisture really shouldnt be a problem at all. When it's really hot and humid outside, I go out to the shop and you can feel a massive difference when you walk into it because the stickyness just goes away as you walk into the door and the temperature is much lower most of the time.

I realize that I did lose all of my pictures and video from mt hope festival, and all of the pics of the steam engine and progress Ive done so far, but alot of the stuff, I used in my youtube videos, so I'll have to see if I have any left on the camera's memory card. The biggest things Im bummed about is that I lost alot of the O&S designs that I was working on, and all of the videos at mt hope that showed how the parting lines and such were done.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #57 on: August 17, 2017, 11:35:16 PM »

I can send you back the OS stuff you sent me.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #58 on: August 18, 2017, 04:30:08 AM »

it's fine, the O&S stuff Im talking about was stuff I doodled up in cad, I had patterns doodled up with coreprints, corebox, and a few other parts that I'll have to try to figure out again. It was done up with a kind of a wierd molding plate so that it could be molded easily. The harddest part was getting it designed to incorperate the bottom cylinder cover and gland nut socket built into the design like the original, and cast it all at once. I think I remember alot of what I was doing back then, but I think once I get back to working on it again, I'll either remember or Ill just figure it out, lol.

I did get all of the parts for the steam engine replaced already, the crankshaft and everything, I have it ready to print out a 1/3rd size copy on the 3d printer to see how I like the look of it.

Also, I had everything all sorted out and categorized, but the backup I restored from, everything is just total chaos, so everything is just a huge mess and will take a few days of putting it back where it was, lol.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #59 on: August 18, 2017, 07:40:54 AM »

That OS is a tricky one to mold.
Much like the Cretors #1, but worse.

It is a very nice looking engine though.
I hope to make one some day.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #60 on: August 19, 2017, 05:22:29 AM »

lol, it isnt really that hard to mold really, just have to make it so it can be cast upside down from what you would normally cast it as, lol. After I get finished with this current engine, Ill start on the patterns for that. Im thinking of making a much smaller version this time, maybe a 2" version compared to the 3" one, one as large as a 3" is a major headache to try to machine on my size of lathe/shaper. Once I get it all figured out and cast, I can send you the patterns so you can make a version also.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 05:24:42 AM by cae2100 »
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #61 on: August 19, 2017, 05:24:59 AM »

The patterns are easy for me.
It is the cores that cause me a great deal of confusion.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #62 on: August 19, 2017, 06:56:29 AM »

lol, it isnt really that hard to mold really, just have to make it so it can be cast upside down from what you would normally cast it as, lol. After I get finished with this current engine, Ill start on the patterns for that. Im thinking of making a much smaller version this time, maybe a 2" version compared to the 3" one, one as large as a 3" is a major headache to try to machine on my size of lathe/shaper. Once I get it all figured out and cast, I can send you the patterns so you can make a version also.

I wonder if those patterns would fit in a flat rate box.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #63 on: August 19, 2017, 08:33:37 AM »

no idea, I was just thinking of bringing it to soule or something, lol. It'd be probably next year before I even get close to getting started on them really. I have a ton of projects going on atm on the queue, and from what Ive learned about this steam engine, I learned much more on how the O&S is supposed to be designed that I didnt even realize before, lol. I have the lathe to finish, current steam engine, shop, my die filer, and the gingery lathe that I need to finish also before I can even get started on anything else tbh. I think that it should keep me busy long through the winter, and when I do run out of time, it'll give me the time to work on the patterns also during the winter.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #64 on: August 19, 2017, 08:44:25 AM »

I am glad I am not the only one with a seemingly endless list of things to do/build.

My wife tells me "Every chance you get, go faster !"
Easier said than done though.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #65 on: August 19, 2017, 03:13:10 PM »

The die filer and gingery lathe have been on the queue for the last 2-3 years now, and the castings have honestly just been sitting in our basement except the little odd bits with the gingery lathe, which I just finished some of the smaller bits in the recent casting sessions. I finally started getting some steel and brass for the projects, so it's getting time to just finish it already, lol.
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cae2100

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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #66 on: September 09, 2017, 07:40:10 AM »

Well, I finally got the steam chest cast out again, and Im really hoping that this one will be the last one, lol. Im starting to get tired of casting those things out, lol. This one has a little bit of flashing but it isnt as bad as it looks, most of it is really thin and with a chisel, it'll just pop right out without any real effort. I think that a steam chest is one of the few parts that would be easier to do on a milling machine, but since I dont have one, Ill just use the chisels and files, lol.
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Re: New Build (3x3 Steam Engine)
« Reply #67 on: September 09, 2017, 01:54:42 PM »

I had to re-cast a lot of the green twin parts, due to one problem or another.

It is not nearly as much fun to cast a second, third, fourth.....etc. piece for the same part as it was to cast the first piece.

Through it all, I did get to be very good at molding and casting parts, so there is a bit of a silver lining there.

I cut up some of the failed green twin base castings, and I was thoroughly impressed with the toughness and rigidity of those pieces, which is good because if the base flexes, then nothing else is going to work.
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