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Author Topic: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop  (Read 5223 times)

fredrosse

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Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« on: May 30, 2011, 11:30:45 PM »

Built in the back yard, sized for building a 20 foot long steam sidewheeler  20 feet wide x 24 feet long.  Chain winches mounted on the trusses that hold up the roof are used to lift the boat off the trailer, so work can continue (and continue, and continue ......) without having to climb around the trailer.  At this point, mostly woodworking machinery here, except for a 13 x 40 metal lathe that fits in a 3 ft x 8 ft "closet", with double rolling doors, so the sawdust can be kept off the metalworking machinery.   The building is heated with high pressure steam.
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admin

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Re: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2011, 01:27:23 AM »

Fred-

That is very funny.

Your garage is built around your boat like a glove.

How high is you steam pressure?

I thought about using a curtain in my shop to draw around the woodworking equipment, but I have not done that yet.  I can also roll my woodworking equipment outside if I need to rip a bunch of stuff.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2011, 01:34:12 AM by PatJ »
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fredrosse

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Re: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2011, 01:44:17 AM »

I have a 100 PSIG firetube boiler, with a domestic oil burner to make steam.  The steam is fed to another firetube boiler, mounted above the fired one, which acts as a steam "radiator", both boiler shells are not insulated, so the bare surfaces give off heat for the building heating duty.  Condensate that forms in the upper boiler shell drains by gravity back to the fired boiler.

In the summertime, I can cure epoxy resin on the boat real fast by turning on the heat.
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farmerden

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Re: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2012, 03:32:38 AM »

Just going over your shop details one more time Fred.When mounting your chain block to the trusses,did you pull from the rafter rather than the bottom chord of the truss? I've always thought that that way is the best way to use a truss as it loads the whole truss rather than just the lower chord.Loading the lower chord would use the whole truss but totally depend on the fasteners holding the truss together. Boy I can talk myself in circles very easily here!! ;D
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fredrosse

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Re: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2014, 03:50:51 PM »

A very long time to reply..............

Attaching the winch to the top of a truss rather than the bottom still requires the truss fasteners to be reliable, they are loaded either way. 

In my case the rafters run 90 degrees to the trusses, somewhat unusual for typical roof construction.
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admin

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Re: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2014, 05:51:46 PM »

I was down in Florida earlier in the year and I noticed with the new construction that they use a lot of metal strapping to tie the foundation piers to the walls, and the walls to the roof.

If you had a hoist in a fixed location you could also add a couple of pieces of metal strapping from the bottom of the joist to the top to tie things together and spread the load more evenly.
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admin

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Re: Fred's Boatbuilding Workshop
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2016, 02:44:18 AM »

Now that you mention it, that does seem a bit odd, but I know Fred has it calculated and all, being an ME.

My garage is about 20'x20', and it is open above the ceiling, and I have floored it and use the attic for storage.
So I know that the space above a garage does not necessarily need trusses.  I have a hip roof.

The trusses running across the garage from side to side would support the roof joists from the side walls.
That is not necessarily how it is commonly done, but as long as the joists are supported, that is what matters.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2016, 02:45:29 AM by admin »
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